Here's some more writers talking about their writing process.

Dave Grohl talked to The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon about how he wrote songs for Foo Fighters' most recent album 'Sonic Highways'.

The band went to eight different cities and eight different studios. After recording instrumentals Grohl would go out to interview someone. Once he had enough interviews he gathered together the transcripts.

"I would pick out words, phrases and sentences from the interviews. Put those on this side of my journal and on this side of my journal I had an outline of the song, and I would sort of cut and paste and fit them in. It was meant to represent that whole week we had been there by telling the stories of the people I had talked to."



Writer and director J.C. Chandor talks to the San Francisco Chronicle about writing his new film 'A Most Violent Year'.

"My writing process is a little unusual. I’m basically able to write three or four things in my head at once...I never actually start writing until I have the character fully cooked in my brain, and then I know it’s time to start getting down some dialogue,” Chandor says. “With Abel, I had this image of him sitting in a trailer formally dressed, hair cut within an inch of its life, everything about him is meticulous, formal, self-serious, and then his surroundings are total, utter decay. I saw that image so clearly and thought, OK, now it’s time to write this thing down.”

Finally, Judd Apatow talks to TV Guide about his upcoming episode of The Simpsons, based on a script he wrote 25 years ago.

"Only six episodes of The Simpsons had aired at that point but I tried to copy the style and did a spec script where Homer gets hypnotized and thinks he's a 10-year-old. He has such a great time being Bart's friend that he doesn't want to become an adult again. I sent it in — in fact, I sent it to all my favorite shows — and got no job offers. I also wrote a spec script for the great Chris Elliott show Get a Life. They at least brought me in for a meeting, but that didn't lead to any work, either. Then, all these years later, [Simpsons executive producer] Al Jean calls and says, ‘Hey, we'll make it now!’"